Back Results for: Research

Translation of Vicente Huidobro's Temblor del cielo

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Please join the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures in congratulating Professor Ignacio Infante on the publication of his new book, a groundbreaking translation of Vicente Huidobro’s Temblor del cielo, available now.

Some coronavirus lessons from Boccaccio

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Giovanni Boccaccio’s masterpiece, the “Decameron,” is set on the outskirts of Florence in 1348. His protagonists have retreated to the countryside in the wake of the Black Death, which is decimating their city both mortally and socially. The book offers important lessons as we confront the global threat of Coronavirus.

What A 14th-Century Italian Novel Teaches Us About Social Distancing

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When a plague swept 14th-century Florence, killing more than half the city’s population, wealthy Italians turned to social distancing. One small group’s retreat from a stricken city to a deserted villa became the backdrop for the classic novel “The Decameron.” That novel is just one of the texts Rebecca Messbarger teaches in her Disease, Madness and Death Italian Style course at Washington University. But it has sudden resonance, she says — and relevance she never anticipated when she began teaching it a year ago.

Changing narratives: WU professor named Library of Congress Kluge Chair

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Sitting down in his office lined with thousands of books and a new Keurig, Professor Ignacio Sánchez Prado, who teaches Mexican cinema, literature and culture at Washington University, divulged his life’s story, his work over the years which culminated in his appointment to the Kluge Chair at the Library of Congress.

A War With Words: How Spain’s Women Lobbied Against Slavery in Cuba

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Interview with Faculty Fellow Akiko Tsuchiya

Professor Harriet Stone publishes new book, Crowning Glories: Netherlandish Realism and the French Imagination during the Reign of Louis XIV

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Please join us in congratulating Professor of French Harriet Stone on the publication of her new book, Crowning Glories: Netherlandish Realism and the French Imagination during the Reign of Louis XIV.

Publication of Staging Frontiers by Professor William Acree.

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Swashbuckling tales of valiant gauchos roaming Argentina and Uruguay were nineteenth-century bestsellers. But when these stories jumped from the page to the circus stage and beyond, their cultural, economic, and political influence revolutionized popular culture and daily life.

New book from Almenara Press co-edited by Professor Elzbieta Sklodowska

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Elzbieta Sklodowska has co-edited with Mabel Cuesta (University of Houston) Lecturas atentas. Una visita desde la ficción y la crítica a veinte narradoras cubanas contemporáneas, which showcases narrative works of contemporary Cuban women authors, both on the island and in the diaspora, accompanied by in-depth critical readings of these texts.

Professor Rebecca Messbarger’s The Lady Anatomist Goes International!

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The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures congratulates Professor of Italian Rebecca Messbarger on the upcoming film based on her book, The Lady Anatomist, which will premiere in Germany on November 3, 2019. The Lady Anatomist details the life of Anna Morandi, one of the most acclaimed anatomical sculptors of the Enlightenment. 

Faculty publication: Unsettling Colonialism: Gender and Race in the Nineteenth-Century Global Hispanic World, by Akiko Tsuchiya

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The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures congratulates Professor of Spanish Akiko Tsuchiya on the publication of her new book, Unsettling Colonialism: Gender and Race in the Nineteenth-Century Global Hispanic World, by SUNY Press.

Prof. Akiko Tsuchiya Awarded the NEH Summer Stipend

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The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures congratulates Professor of Spanish Akiko Tsuchiya, the recipient of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Summer Stipend for her project, “Spanish Women of Letters in the Nineteenth-century Antislavery Movement: Transnational Networks and Exchanges.”

Olin Acquires a Valuable Resource for French Studies

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Thanks to the extensive efforts of Professor Seth Graebner, Daria Carson-Dussan, and Cassie Brand, Olin Library has recently purchased the Pascal Pia Collection of French literature. Named after the pseudonym of poet and literary critic Pierre Durand (1903-1979), this major collection of rare works includes 1000 items in French literature and criticism published between 1800 and 1977 and acquired by Pia. The collection includes, among other works, a significant amount of unique Surrealist ephemera.

Publication of Representing Mental Illness in Late Medieval France. Machines, Madness, Metaphor, by Professor Julie Singer

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The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures congratulates Associate Professor of French Julie Singer on the publication of her book, Representing Mental Illness in Late Medieval France. Machines, Madness, Metaphor.

Literatura en los Siglos XIX y XX, Antonio Saborit, Ignacio M. Sánchez Prado y Jorge Ortega (coordinadores)

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