Back Results for: Faculty

Professor Acree serving as faculty marshal in Spring 2021 graduate school commencement

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Professor Acree will be a faculty marshal at graduate school commencement.

Prof. Moraña publishes two new books: Pensar el cuerpo Historia, materialidad y símbolo and Líneas de fuga ciudadanía, frontera y sujeto migrante

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Two new publications by Prof. Moraña, Professor of Spanish and Program Director of Latin American Studies and William H. Gass Professor in Arts and Sciences

RLL Faculty & Students share their poetry on Life/Lines

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RLL Faculty and Students participate in the Center for Humanities Poetry Exercises, Life/Lines.

Francophone Week March 20th-26th, 2021

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Join the the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures for Francophone Week, March 20th-26th, 2021.

Publication of Liquid borders: migration as resistance

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The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures and the Latin American Studies Program congratulates Professor Mabel Moraña latest publication, Liquid Borders migration as resistance with Routledge.

Professor Michael Sherberg publishes The Decameron Fourth Day in Perspective

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The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures congratulates Professor Sherberg on the publication of his book, The Decameron fourth day in perspective with the University of Toronto Press.

Graduate Fellow Olivia Lott lauded with PEN translation honor

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PhD candidate Olivia Lott was named as a finalist for a prominent literary award, the PEN Award for Poetry in Translation. In this Q&A, Lott talks about the process of bringing ‘Katabasis’ to new audiences, about her reaction to the PEN shout-out, and for her recommendations of additional must-read translated poetry books.

Professor Tili Boon Cuillé publishes Divining Nature: Aesthetics of Enchantment in Enlightenment France

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The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures congratulates Associate Professor of French and Comparative Literature Tili Boon Cuillé on the publication of her new book, Divining Nature: Aesthetics of Enchantment in Enlightenment France with Stanford University Press.

Prof. Ignacio Infante Receives Emerson's 2020 Excellence in Teaching Award

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The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures congratulates Professor of Spanish and Comparative Literature Ignacio Infante on his selection as one of Emerson’s 2020 Excellence in Teaching Award recipients. The Emerson Excellence in Teaching Awards Program, now in its 31st year, recognizes approximately 100 educators in the St. Louis metropolitan area annually for their leadership in and passion for teaching, their contributions to student learning, and their knowledge and creativity.

Professor Rebecca Messbarger wins the Rome Prize Fellowship in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies

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The department extends a huge congratulations to Professor of Italian Rebecca Messbarger, who is the recipient of a Rome Prize fellowship in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies from the American Academy in Rome (AAR).

Publication of Mabel Moraña's Philosophy and Criticism in Latin America: From Mariátegui to Sloterdijk

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The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures and the Latin American Studies Program congratulates Professor Mabel Moraña on the publication of her new book, Philosophy and Criticism in Latin America: From Mariátegui to Sloterdijk, as part of the Cambria Latin American Literatures and Cultures Series with Cambria Press.

On Race, Colonialism, and Falling Monuments in Spain and the US, By Professor Akiko Tsuchiya

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On June 4, 2020, the governor of Virginia ordered the removal of Richmond’s monument to Confederate General Robert E. Lee, amidst demonstrations across the country against police brutality and systemic racism. His announcement provided a renewed momentum, among racial justice activists, to demand the elimination of all public symbols of white supremacy. Other cities across the nation soon followed suit, ordering the dismantling of Confederate statues, even as protesters, in many places, took the lead in toppling these monuments.

Professor William Acree wins LASA 2020 Best Book Award

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It is our distinct pleasure to announce that a jury composed by Agnes Lugo-Ortiz (University of Chicago), Shelley Garrigan (NC State University), and Michel Gobat (University of Pittsburgh) have selected two wonderful new monographs to receive the LASA 2020-BEST BOOK AWARD IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. 

Professor Rebecca Messbarger Interviewed by CNN: Here's how Italians 'quaranteamed' 700 years ago

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How was social distance observed (if at all) during previous pandemics? Turns out there's quite a precedent not just for staying away for your neighbors, but also for the idea of "quaranteaming" you might have heard about. CNN talked to Rebecca Messbarger, a professor of Italian and founding director of the Medical Humanities program at Washington University in St. Louis about social distancing from the Black Plague until now. The parts about the different ways people deal with distance still ring true.

Professor Ignacio Infante Publishes a Translation of Vicente Huidobro's Temblor del cielo

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Please join the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures in congratulating Professor Ignacio Infante on the publication of his new book, a groundbreaking translation of Vicente Huidobro’s Temblor del cielo, available now.

Professor Michael Sherberg Offers Some Coronavirus Lessons From Boccaccio

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Giovanni Boccaccio’s masterpiece, the “Decameron,” is set on the outskirts of Florence in 1348. His protagonists have retreated to the countryside in the wake of the Black Death, which is decimating their city both mortally and socially. The book offers important lessons as we confront the global threat of Coronavirus.

Professor Rebecca Messbarger Explains What A 14th-Century Italian Novel Teaches Us About Social Distancing

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When a plague swept 14th-century Florence, killing more than half the city’s population, wealthy Italians turned to social distancing. One small group’s retreat from a stricken city to a deserted villa became the backdrop for the classic novel “The Decameron.” That novel is just one of the texts Rebecca Messbarger teaches in her Disease, Madness and Death Italian Style course at Washington University. But it has sudden resonance, she says — and relevance she never anticipated when she began teaching it a year ago.

Academe’s Shameful Neglect of Spanish, By Professor Ignacio Sánchez Prado

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Researchers and students engaging with the U.S.’s second-largest language are ignored in our universities — and in ‘The Chronicle’

Changing Narratives: WU Professor Ignacio Sánchez Prado Named Library of Congress Kluge Chair

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Sitting down in his office lined with thousands of books and a new Keurig, Professor Ignacio Sánchez Prado, who teaches Mexican cinema, literature and culture at Washington University, divulged his life’s story, his work over the years which culminated in his appointment to the Kluge Chair at the Library of Congress.

Prof. Rebecca Messbarger's New Course Explores Seven Centuries of Dealing With Death in Italy

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In her course “Disease, Madness, and Death Italian Style,” Rebecca Messbarger, professor of ltalian and founding director of the Medical Humanities Program at Washington University, takes students through seven centuries of Italian culture, beginning with The Decameron and the plague of 1348.

Jarvis Thurston and Mona Van Duyn Professor in the Humanities Ignacio Sánchez Prado responds to 'American Dirt' in Washington Post article

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‘American Dirt’ gets Mexico very wrong. It’s the latest in a long trend.

A War With Words: How Spain’s Women Lobbied Against Slavery in Cuba

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Interview with Faculty Fellow Akiko Tsuchiya

Professor Harriet Stone publishes new book, Crowning Glories: Netherlandish Realism and the French Imagination during the Reign of Louis XIV

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Please join us in congratulating Professor of French Harriet Stone on the publication of her new book, Crowning Glories: Netherlandish Realism and the French Imagination during the Reign of Louis XIV.

Prof. Sánchez Prado Installed as Jarvis Thurston & Mona Van Duyn Professor in the Humanities

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The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures congratulates Professor Ignacio Sánchez Prado on his recent installation as the Jarvis Thurston and Mona Van Duyn Professor in the Humanities.

Publication of Staging Frontiers by Professor William Acree.

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Swashbuckling tales of valiant gauchos roaming Argentina and Uruguay were nineteenth-century bestsellers. But when these stories jumped from the page to the circus stage and beyond, their cultural, economic, and political influence revolutionized popular culture and daily life.

New book from Almenara Press co-edited by Professor Elzbieta Sklodowska

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Elzbieta Sklodowska has co-edited with Mabel Cuesta (University of Houston) Lecturas atentas. Una visita desde la ficción y la crítica a veinte narradoras cubanas contemporáneas, which showcases narrative works of contemporary Cuban women authors, both on the island and in the diaspora, accompanied by in-depth critical readings of these texts.

Professor Rebecca Messbarger’s The Lady Anatomist Goes International!

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The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures congratulates Professor of Italian Rebecca Messbarger on the upcoming film based on her book, The Lady Anatomist, which will premiere in Germany on November 3, 2019. The Lady Anatomist details the life of Anna Morandi, one of the most acclaimed anatomical sculptors of the Enlightenment. 

Faculty publication: Unsettling Colonialism: Gender and Race in the Nineteenth-Century Global Hispanic World, by Akiko Tsuchiya

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The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures congratulates Professor of Spanish Akiko Tsuchiya on the publication of her new book, Unsettling Colonialism: Gender and Race in the Nineteenth-Century Global Hispanic World, by SUNY Press.

Prof. Akiko Tsuchiya Awarded the NEH Summer Stipend

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The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures congratulates Professor of Spanish Akiko Tsuchiya, the recipient of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Summer Stipend for her project, “Spanish Women of Letters in the Nineteenth-century Antislavery Movement: Transnational Networks and Exchanges.”

Sigma Delta Pi inducts five new members

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The Sigma Delta Pi chapter Beta Omega Initiation Ceremony took place on Wednesday, May 1, and was a real success.

Olin Acquires a Valuable Resource for French Studies

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Thanks to the extensive efforts of Professor Seth Graebner, Daria Carson-Dussan, and Cassie Brand, Olin Library has recently purchased the Pascal Pia Collection of French literature. Named after the pseudonym of poet and literary critic Pierre Durand (1903-1979), this major collection of rare works includes 1000 items in French literature and criticism published between 1800 and 1977 and acquired by Pia. The collection includes, among other works, a significant amount of unique Surrealist ephemera.

Billy Acree receives the GSS Outstanding Faculty Mentor Award

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Professor William (Billy) Acree received the Graduate Student Senate’s 2019 Outstanding Faculty Mentor award. The GSS Outstanding Faculty & Staff Awards are given out annually to recognize faculty and staff members who “make significant contributions to the graduate student experience.”

Congratulations to Javier García-Liendo

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The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures congratulates Javier García-Liendo on his promotion to Associate Professor with Tenure.

Professor William Acree receives NEH Fellowship for his project on “The Creole Circus”

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The Department congratulates Assistant Professor of Spanish William Acree, who has been awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Fellowship for his project, entitled, “The Creole Circus and the Making of a Theatergoing Public in Uruguay and Argentina, 1860-1910.”

Billy Acree receives Humanities Book Award

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Publication of Representing Mental Illness in Late Medieval France. Machines, Madness, Metaphor, by Professor Julie Singer

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The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures congratulates Associate Professor of French Julie Singer on the publication of her book, Representing Mental Illness in Late Medieval France. Machines, Madness, Metaphor.

Good Gaucho Gone Bad: The Creole Drama

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In the 1880s, a new kind of performance became the craze in Argentina and Uruguay. These wild "Creole dramas" glorified country life and the occasionally violent exploits of gauchos*, or Argentinian cowboys. In addition to being hugely fun to watch, the stories appealed to audiences experiencing rapid modernization and waves of immigration.

Welcome New Colleagues

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Department Welcomes Nancy Morejón

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Literatura en los Siglos XIX y XX, Antonio Saborit, Ignacio M. Sánchez Prado y Jorge Ortega (coordinadores)

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